The urge to share news of our lives isn’t new

Narcissism is defined as excessive self-love or self-centeredness. In Greek mythology, Narcissus fell in love when he saw his reflection in water: He gazed so long, he eventually died. Today, the quintessential image is not someone staring at his reflection but into his mobile phone. While we pine away for that perfect Snapchat filter or track our likes on Instagram, the mobile phone has become a vortex of social media that sucks us in and feeds our narcissistic tendencies. Or so it would seem.

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But people have long used media to see reflections of themselves. Long before mobile phones or even photography, diaries were kept as a way to understand oneself and the world one inhabits. In the 18th and 19th centuries, as secular diaries became more popular, middle-class New Englanders, particularly white women, wrote about their everyday lives and the world around them. These diaries were not a place into which they poured their innermost thoughts and desires, but rather a place to chronicle the social world around them–what’s going on around the house, what they did today, who came to visit, who was born, or who died. The diaries captured the everyday routines of mid-19th-century life, with women diarists in particular focused not on themselves but on their families and their communities more broadly.
— Leer en www.fastcompany.com/90243933/the-urge-to-share-news-of-our-lives-is-neither-new-nor-narcissistic

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