Most corporate team building is a waste of time and money. I say this based on my 25+ years of research and practice in the field of team effectiveness. Seventeen of those years were with Mars Inc., a family-owned $35 billion global business with a commitment to collaboration.

Many companies, when they decide to invest in team building, decide to do offsite events like bowling nights or ropes courses. Sometimes these events get really elaborate. One sales and marketing executive I know told me how he was flown to London with 20 of his colleagues, put up in a pricey hotel, and then trained to do the haka, a traditional war dance, by a group of Maori tribe members from New Zealand. This exercise was supposed to build relationships and bolster team spirit, and, by extension, improve collaboration. Instead, it fostered embarrassment and cynicism. Months later, the failing division was sold off.

Mars was not immune to the conventional wisdom. Before making the commitment to study collaboration intensively, we also did things like this. Once, we spent thousands of dollars to hire an orchestra to spend an hour with a group of senior leaders at an offsite retreat and help them work together in harmony. It was a nice metaphor and an interesting experience. It did nothing, though, to change how that group of leaders worked together.

Events like these may get people to feel closer for a little while; shared emotions can bond people. Those bonds, though, do not hold up under the day-to-day pressures of an organization focused on delivering results.

In 2011 senior HR leaders at Mars decided that we would study our global workforce and try to crack the code of how to maximize team effectiveness. The resulting research, which I led, revealed that most of what we — and others — thought about team building was wrong. Most important, we learned that quality collaboration does not begin with relationships and trust; it starts with a focus on individual motivation.

Our research drew on data from 125 teams. It included questionnaires and interviews with hundreds of team members. We asked, among other things, how clear people were about the teams’ priorities, what their own and others’ objectives were, and what they felt most confident about and most worried about. If there was one dominant theme from the interviews, it is summarized in this remarkable sentiment: “I really like and value my teammates. And I know we should collaborate more. We just don’t.”
— Leer en hbr.org/2018/09/stop-wasting-money-on-team-building

Interim Manage con más de venticinco años de experiencia en el sector del desarrollo de estratégias de Ventas, Marketing y Desarrollo de equipos Comerciales. Des hace 5 años trabajo el mundo del social selling y del marketing de influencers. Me muevo en muchos sectores, desde el Diy a la moda, pasadno por el turismo y las empresas de servicio. En los poryecto asumo responsabilidades como Director del Departamento Comercial o Marketing y asumiendo tareas de Marketing y Comunicación, desarrollando y ejecutando planes estratégicos de apertura de nueva cartera de clientes y desarrollando la estrategia de fidelización clientes (CRM). Con gran capacidad comunicativa, aptitud pedagógica, resolutivo y cooperativo (trabajo en equipo). MAs de 20 años de experiencia en formación en ventas y marketing. Además he trabajado Consultor Senior en instituciones públicas tales como la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, IQS, EUNCET, UB, Cámara de Comercio de Sabadell, Terrassa y Manresa y empresas del sector privado. He tenido el honor de ser profesor de marketing relacional en La Salle, en la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, y de investigación de mercados en la EUNCET y FundemiIQS. Colaboro habitualmente con el Colegio Oficial de Agentes Comerciales de Barcelona y de Barcelona Activa. Además he sido Consultor Senior de desarrollo comercial estrategico en proyectos MEDA UE (Damasco, Aleppo, Cairo) y en consorcios europeo Expero2EU y Trainet. He tenido el placer de sermiembro del equipo que ha desarrollado el sello de calidad comercial con SGS y COACB

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